The Sketchbook Book Project 2013 – Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi-2736-2

Click on image to enlarge

Xoi Ga Bun   2001

Sticky rice, chicken, round rice noodles

Bamboo portfolio

Saunders Waterford, Arches 90wt, bamboo, spirit, rice and other paper from Vietnam, Old Vietnamese book, museum board, watercolor, rubbings, gouache,

Paintings and drawings, old Vietnamese book, Xerox transfers, fan, buffalo stamp, pen and ink, street litter,

Fabric, notepaper, newspaper, ribbon, thread, raffia

Poems by the artist

10 x 7 ¼ inches

The paper in Sketchbook Project 2013 http://www.sketchbookproject.com/ I received in the mail is thin and creamy colored. I’m planning on taking the book apart, using the original cover, but adding my own paper.

Photographing chairs has been an ongoing project of mine. This seems to be a good place to start.

Yesterday I printed on standard copy paper about 30 pages of images pertaining to chairs and sitting. This morning I’ll scan some drawings done during my travels. The paper is too thin to really dig into or paint on so I may gesso one side of the page to give it some body or cover the image with a clear mat medium. The images are both horizontal and vertical. We’ll see which orientation wins out.

The image above  is  from a book I made in Vietnam. I cut paper before we left on our trip. Each day I would take a few sheets to draw on. Some art supplies and a few sheets of paper fit in my backpack without having to carry around the weight of a sketchbook. The sheets of paper were separate too so I could put them together any way I wanted when I got home.

Getting Locked in the National Library – Bhutan

One morning I took a taxi up the hill to see Mynak Tulku, the archivist at the National Library in Thimphu. He wasn’t there so I spent hours between the stacks painting all alone. Manuscripts are imprinted using wood blocks. The prayers are printed or written on long strips of handmade paper. These are stacked between two pieces of wood and  are wrapped in brilliantly colored cloth or in silk cloth held together with a leather thong. When I was hungry and tired I packed up and went hunting for the exit. All the lights were turned off. There was no one in the building. I wondered if they would come back after lunch or if they were closed until the next day. I had no phone with me. Deciding I’d better find an alternative way to get out I checked windows and any other possible exits. No luck, so I went back to the huge tall main door, went up to it and unlocked it, pushed and it opened quite easily. I was out in the bright sunshine, still all alone. So I started walking down the hill, eventually finding Thimphu. Click on the image to see the transfer print and sample of traditional textiles used for Bhutanese clothing.

Varnish and Ink from Bhutan Cover my Hands

Yesterday I did pick up a brush, but it was for polyurethane varnish. I went over to a friend’s studio where I met her daughter, a blogger I had been following. http://thegirlinthehat.wordpress.com/ While we kept our hands busy making something, we quizzed each other about wordpress and blogging. It was great fun – fun to see each other’s faces and to have a conversation in person.

Seeking suggestions on what to add to the Bhutan scrolls I had made earlier, I brought them with me. Along with the scrolls, I brought prayer paper from Thimpu. When I was visiting Thimpu, I spent an afternoon at the saturday art school; we looked at each other’s work and painted together.  After school, one of the students took me to a store where I bought some prayer books. Actually, the books were separate pieces of printed handmade paper. Yesterday, I felt close to Bhutan. My wet varnish stained hands were covered with Bhutanese ink from the prayer paper. What will become of the box? Maybe it will become part of an Artist’s book about that part of the world at the base of Mt. Everest. Mt. Everest is so high; the white mountain was above the clouds on a clear day as we were flying towards the Paro airport. As usual, click on the images to see them bigger.

Intuitive Collisions, An Artists’ Book – California 1999

When I started making Artists’ Books I thought people have been making books for years and anyway, I’m a painter. What can I do that would be different? I decided to make a big book. Each page is made up of two oil paintings on canvas, stretcher bars included. Metal prongs hold them together. What is Intuitive Collisions about? My father was a financier, an industrialist and I was an artist. Our minds couldn’t have been farther apart. We ended up taking early morning walks together. He would talk to me about building a bridge or how the stock market was doing.  I would be looking at how the fog masked out the vineyard leaving only the trees to see. By the end of the walk, we’d be happy to have spent some time with each other. I think we understood each other a little bit better, too.

Intuitive Collisions  1999

Oil, transfers, acrylic on canvas, stretcher bars, wood joiners,

prong type glides, metal hinges

14″ x 29″ x 9″     58 inches open book