Destroy a Flower and Draw!

Four Dahlias

Dahlias from Fran (click on image to enlarge)

You don’t need any art supplies to draw. Go on. Try it. smear a little more coffee on that coffee ring stain.  Take your pen and add a few strokes. Coffee is such a beautiful color. It smells good too.

When I was in Egypt I was sketching  and dipped a stick into a small bottle of  brown ink that I had in my backpack.  I got back to the hotel and noticed my sketch book smelled strange. I had mistaken a bottle of Echinacea for walnut ink and made a drawing with it. I brought the herbal remedy along to  boost my immune system and reduce the severity or length of a cold.

The herbal drawing of the Temple of Luxor has kept it’s color. It’s kept its  smell, too!

Dip your finger in that glass of red wine, pat it on a piece of paper. Any curry powder around?

Dahlias

 

The Sketchbook Book Project 2013 – Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi-2736-2

Click on image to enlarge

Xoi Ga Bun   2001

Sticky rice, chicken, round rice noodles

Bamboo portfolio

Saunders Waterford, Arches 90wt, bamboo, spirit, rice and other paper from Vietnam, Old Vietnamese book, museum board, watercolor, rubbings, gouache,

Paintings and drawings, old Vietnamese book, Xerox transfers, fan, buffalo stamp, pen and ink, street litter,

Fabric, notepaper, newspaper, ribbon, thread, raffia

Poems by the artist

10 x 7 ¼ inches

The paper in Sketchbook Project 2013 http://www.sketchbookproject.com/ I received in the mail is thin and creamy colored. I’m planning on taking the book apart, using the original cover, but adding my own paper.

Photographing chairs has been an ongoing project of mine. This seems to be a good place to start.

Yesterday I printed on standard copy paper about 30 pages of images pertaining to chairs and sitting. This morning I’ll scan some drawings done during my travels. The paper is too thin to really dig into or paint on so I may gesso one side of the page to give it some body or cover the image with a clear mat medium. The images are both horizontal and vertical. We’ll see which orientation wins out.

The image above  is  from a book I made in Vietnam. I cut paper before we left on our trip. Each day I would take a few sheets to draw on. Some art supplies and a few sheets of paper fit in my backpack without having to carry around the weight of a sketchbook. The sheets of paper were separate too so I could put them together any way I wanted when I got home.

Abstract Three -Creative Inspiration Comes From an Uncomfortable Condition

click on image

Traveling, I travel across the floor. Thinking of  the look of a rubbing from an french antique metal chair ( you know, the ones with lots of uniform holes punched out on the seat) I started this sketch making freehand circles with a graphite pencil. The circles represent steps. Do you ever wake up in the very early morning and pace back and forth? I do. So I draw until I get sleepy, then go back to bed. I tore up one of my drawings and glued it in place lining it up with marks from the drawing below. The title, Night Walkers, came from the title of a publication put out by the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation.

Night Walkers mixed media on white paper 6″ x 8″

Ye Ye or Grandfather

Grandfather-0136

For centuries Chinese children have learned calligraphy by writing characters within boxes in order to understand their structure and proportions. When I was in China I bought children’s text books on calligraphy. Each work page shows a correctly drawn character. The children copy this in a graph under an image illustrating the word. The characters luck, long life and grandfather are represented here. The two-dimensional chart and stencils give a nice balance to the three-dimensional portrait. The image came from one of my photographs of a farmer we met while walking in the countryside. He had five children. Later we learned he had seven. Two were girls but they didn’t count.

‘Grandfather’ mixed media on canvas 36″x26″