A Conversation Between Paintings

3 paintings

OPPOSITES What would be the opposite to the big painting? #1 The big painting falls loosely to the floor 56″ x 77″.  I used a white gessoed old canvas. #2 The small canvas is stretched tightly and gessoed  black. 11″ x 14″ #1 With charcoal and a brush I  sketched a line  drawing of tulips then continued to write freely on the canvas. #2 Repeating a formal pattern of  black and white using shapes or form,  I used a palette knife in some areas. The purple shaped tulip form or mass echoes the line drawing of the flower in the big painting. #1 Free script covers the canvas. #2 Stamped letters are incorporated in the pattern. A little yellow balances the complimentary color purple. #1 main color – green #2 main colors black and white

detail

I’d never painted a checkerboard pattern of black and white shapes. When I sit and study it I see all the variations in painting application, value, intensity of whites. There is a lot to look at. Subtle differences in paint application create variations in value and intensity. I worked on it until my eye could move around the canvas without being interrupted by anything. One area didn’t dominate the picture. The small dots picked up from the rough surface of the canvas work with the other elements.

checkerboard 2

Raoul Dufy and Me – Southern France

Click on image to see detail

Carla’s interpretation of view in Larmet, France

The camera’s interpretation of the scene

Megan’s interpretation of the scene

Upon entering a hotel room in Aix en Provence, many years ago, I noticed a familiar print by Dufy hanging on the wall next to the window. Accompanying the print was a note saying Raoul Dufy had painted the watercolor from this window. Yes, right there, I was looking out the window at the same scene painted in the 1920’s. Of course, I had to paint that scene. Now, my watercolor is framed and hanging in my daughter’s house. In August, I painted the another view in France, with her daughter. Here are three interpretations of the same view.

“I think a painter is happy because he is in harmony with nature as soon as he can express what he sees.” Vincent van Gogh

Bordeaux Toes Paired with Abstract Tool Shed – Southern France

Tool Shed by Carla –  shapes and complimentary color (click on image)

While collaborating on this blog project for two weeks, my grand daughter and I covered the basics of drawing:

Line, Form, Value, Space, Texture, Pattern and Color. We ended our drawing sessions with free, expressive figure drawings working with live models. Thinking about subject matter, we covered Landscape, Figurative, Still Life and Abstract Art using a variety of materials. We talked about the importance of Variation: variation in line, form or shape, value, space, texture, pattern and color. We had a great time together. For me, having a buddy to sketch with was the best!

Bordeaux Toes –  Megan’s first drawing in her Moleskine sketchbook – Value

Inspiration From Trip to France – Get Out Those Art Supplies!

After a trip, usually I am stimulated and ready to go back to the studio. I want to paint, make Artist’s Books, draw, and write -in some way interpret what I experienced during my travels. Megan got right in there. I’m so proud of her. Look at this! Her  drawing fills the page. It’s big. Paint and color have been added to her drawing – the next step after drawing. This piece will be perfect for her portfolio. Megan is planning on applying for an art scholarship. I suggested she add her small moleskine sketchbook that she filled up in France. There are some fine drawings to be seen in there.

Our two weeks of  drawing together have ended. It will be a long time before we see each other again. But there is WordPress!

We are thinking of  Megan being my guest blogger in the future – maybe we will do Megan’s Monday – Carla and Megan’s Blog.  Then she will have her own posts on the internet.