Shades of Grey – Trying to be Straight

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               Trying to be Straight   mixed media on canvas   56″ x 77″     double click on image

 

How do I write about this painting? The painting isn’t finished. The photograph shows a parallax error. This is a report on it’s beginnings. It’s trying to be straight, but its not. The measurements are a little bit off. How do I make a straight line? The canvas is five by six feet. I’m small. By trial and error I put together a painting using a T-square, a plumb line. I tied a weight to the end of a string. The string fell straight down. The painting is about connecting two marks or points to make a line. A straight line is the shortest distance between two points. A line has a beginning, movement and a stop. A line can go off to infinity in both directions. Here, lines are broken leaving room to wander through space.There’s a grid or it it a net?  The goalie misses the ball; loopholes are found in tax laws. Shape, is it really a solid square?  The white line – Is it the bulkhead at the pool?  impermeable? The painting  looks milky. But, milkiness exists. The edges of things are not quite what they seem. The plumb line is our constant.The mind set is complicated.

Inspiration for this painting came from a collage by Canadian painter Stephen MacInnis. The Long Series is a group of mixed media paintings on paper. 12″x12″. Stephen’s  goal is to complete 10,000 pieces. At the moment he has completed over 1,400. I just bought this one. It’s interesting to me, that I, too, have been  working on a lot of the same things. Click on images to enlarge.

 

Macinnis.http://sbmacinnis.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/long-series-1515/

1515

A Conversation Between Paintings

3 paintings

OPPOSITES What would be the opposite to the big painting? #1 The big painting falls loosely to the floor 56″ x 77″.  I used a white gessoed old canvas. #2 The small canvas is stretched tightly and gessoed  black. 11″ x 14″ #1 With charcoal and a brush I  sketched a line  drawing of tulips then continued to write freely on the canvas. #2 Repeating a formal pattern of  black and white using shapes or form,  I used a palette knife in some areas. The purple shaped tulip form or mass echoes the line drawing of the flower in the big painting. #1 Free script covers the canvas. #2 Stamped letters are incorporated in the pattern. A little yellow balances the complimentary color purple. #1 main color – green #2 main colors black and white

detail

I’d never painted a checkerboard pattern of black and white shapes. When I sit and study it I see all the variations in painting application, value, intensity of whites. There is a lot to look at. Subtle differences in paint application create variations in value and intensity. I worked on it until my eye could move around the canvas without being interrupted by anything. One area didn’t dominate the picture. The small dots picked up from the rough surface of the canvas work with the other elements.

checkerboard 2

A Conversation – Line and Shape

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Why do I paint? I like the process of painting, the challenge. I lay down one stroke, That stroke calls for another stroke and the process continues until I have a “there it is” moment, when the painting is done. My tool  – This brush has traveled with me from studio to studio. The material – Medium weight cotton duck canvas stapled to the wall.  I covered the surface with gesso, a paint medium used as a base to protect the raw canvas. While I am in the process of covering the canvas with a base, I really like what  happens. Priming the canvas I start in the middle and work  my way out. This application of paint tightens the canvas as I work my way out to the edges. I’ll end up a with a nicely taut canvas with no wrinkles.  But first look at this! There’s a painting right here. In the first image I like the dark square on the natural color rectangle; rounded 3 dimensional wrinkles or lines radiate outward.  The second image is a pleasing shape playing with the original support, the picture plane.The third image becomes a photograph of an abstract image showing variation in lines created with a big brush, drips and wrinkled canvas – reminds me of Franz Kline. http://www.gagosian.com/artists/franz-kline